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The Crucial Missing Elements: Review of Leithart, Deep Exegesis, ch 4

Peter J Leithart Deep Exegesis: The Mystery of Reading Scripture, Baylor 2009
Chapter 4: The Text is a Joke

The subtitle for this chapter is “Intertextuality” (p109).  This chapter is an exploration of why some people will get a certain joke while others will not, and why some people can read things into texts that others simply can’t see. Leithart bemoans how students of the Bible are “usually inoculated against literary fancies early on in their training. The more expert they get, the more inoculated they become” (109). Of course this inoculation against eisegesis, that is reading things into the text that are not there, renders the exegetical methods of the patristic Fathers and the Bible itself alien, shocking and inaccessible to the modern interpreter (110). Leithart agrees this is well motivated, but that it has resulted in “drastically under-reading scripture” (111). As a positive example he quotes Dale Allison’s interpretation of Matt 1:1, “The interpretation of this line can be…
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Thanks to Taylor Weaver for uploading and pointing this out, Haven't had a chance to watch this yet but I know it will be of interest to a number of my readers :-) You're welcome.


That one time Jesus got the Bible wrong

It's so typical isn't it? You are preaching all day long, training your disciples, sparring with the Pharisees, encouraging the poor and down trodden, healing the sick and casting out demons, all day, day after day, and even when you go up a mountain to get a rest the crowds hunt you down and follow you up, and then the one time you get a bit muddled up with some of the details of a biblical text . . . that is the one they write down in the first gospel - verbatim. At least Matthew and Luke had the good sense to do some editing. But Mark, he always had his eye on giving the public the "historical Jesus" whoever that is supposed to be . . . warts and all. Thanks a lot Mark!

Some think I made the mistake on purpose, just to show the Pharisees up.

For some there is no mistake worth mentioning, only a slightly ambiguous turn of phrase.

Others think I am doing something tricky with Abiathar's name, getting him to figuratively stand in for the priesthood.

It really has…

How to type Greek accent and breathing in Tyndale unicode keyboard

I love my free Tyndale unicode keyboard for biblical languages and use it for my work. But I have often found it difficult to type an accent and a breathing mark above the same letter. Often I give up and just copy and paste it from elsewhere. Perhaps I have sometimes done it but then I have later forgotten how. Anyway, today I worked it out and I'm writing a blog post to help me remember the trick. Maybe it will be of use to you also?


e.g. ὄνομα or ἔχω

For smooth breathing you hold down [right-Alt] and press [ ' ], if you also want an accent press [ / ] while [right-Alt] is still depressed, then release, then type your letter. 

e.g. ὅσπερ or ὕπαγε

For rough breath you hold down [right-Alt] and [Shift] together, press [ ' ] and then while Alt and Shift are still depressed press [ / ], then release, then type you letter.

NB. nothing will appear until you type the letter. 

It is not as fiddly as it sounds, once you get used to it, and if you can remember what to do when you need t…